Social Connectedness, Perceived Isolation, and Dementia: Does the Social Environment Moderate the Relationship Between Genetic Risk and Cognitive Well-Being?

TitleSocial Connectedness, Perceived Isolation, and Dementia: Does the Social Environment Moderate the Relationship Between Genetic Risk and Cognitive Well-Being?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsPoey, JL, Burr, JA, J Roberts, S
JournalGerontologist
Volume57
Issue6
Pagination1031-1040
Date Published2017 11 10
ISSN Number1758-5341
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and over, Apolipoprotein E4, Cognition, Dementia, Female, Gene-Environment Interaction, Humans, Loneliness, Male, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Social Environment, Social Perception, Social Support
Abstract

Purpose of the Study: This study examined whether the social environment moderates the relationship between the APOE e4 allele and cognitive functioning.

Design and Methods: The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS) data and multinomial logistic regression models were used to investigate these relationships for a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults aged 70 and older (n = 779).

Results: Living alone (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 5.814; p = .000) and self-reported loneliness (RRR = 1.928, p = .049) were associated with a greater risk of cognitive difficulty. Living arrangements, perceived social support, and loneliness were found to moderate the relationship between the APOE e4 allele and cognitive function.

Implications: The results support the need to consider the social context when examining cognitive well-being in later life. These findings also indicate a need for the development of policies and services that promote a rich social environment.

URLhttps://academic.oup.com/gerontologist/article/2951236/Social
DOI10.1093/geront/gnw154
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28329797?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalGerontologist
Citation Key8945
PubMed ID28329797