Social support, social strain, and cognitive function among community-dwelling U.S. Chinese older adults.

TitleSocial support, social strain, and cognitive function among community-dwelling U.S. Chinese older adults.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsGe, S, Wu, B, Bailey, Jr., DE, Dong, XQ
JournalJournals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume72
Issuesuppl_1
PaginationS16-S21
Date Published2017 Jul 01
ISSN Number1758-535X
KeywordsAdult children, Cognitive Ability, Community-dwelling
Abstract

Background: Limited research is available on the relationship between social support, social strain, and cognitive function among community-dwelling U.S. Chinese older adults. This study aims to examine the associations between social support/strain and cognitive outcomes.

Methods: Data were drawn from the Population-Based Study of Chinese Elderly (N = 3,159). Cognitive function was measured by a battery of tests including the East Boston Memory Test, the Digit Span Backwards assessment, and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test. Social support and strain were measured by the scales drawn from the Health and Retirement study. Multiple regression analyses were conducted.

Results: Social support was significantly associated with global cognitive function (β = .11, SE = .02, p < .001), episodic memory (β = .11, SE = .03, p < .001), working memory (β = .18, SE = .08, p < .05), and executive function (β = 1.44, SE = .37, p < .001). Social strain was significantly associated with global cognitive function (β = .23, SE = .05, p < .001), episodic memory (β = .27, SE = .07, p < .001), working memory (β = .34, SE = .17, p < .05), and executive function (β = 2.75, SE = .85, p < .01). In terms of sources of social support/strain, higher support from friends was significantly associated with higher global cognitive function (β = .04, SE = .02, p < .05), higher episodic memory (β = .05, SE = .02, p < .05), and higher executive function (β = .71, SE = .29, p < .05). Higher strain from spouse was significantly associated with higher global cognitive function (β = .10, SE = .03, p < .01), higher episodic memory (β = .11, SE = .04, p < .01), and higher executive function (β = 1.28, SE = .49, p < .01). Higher strain from friends was significantly associated with higher executive function (β = 3.59, SE = 1.17, p < .01).

Conclusions: Social support and strain were associated with cognitive outcomes. Future longitudinal studies should be conducted.

DOI10.1093/gerona/glw221
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28575260?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalJ. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci.
Citation Key9120
PubMed ID28575260