Grandparent Caregiving, Race, and Cognitive Functioning in a Population-Based Sample of Older Adults

TitleGrandparent Caregiving, Race, and Cognitive Functioning in a Population-Based Sample of Older Adults
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsSneed, RS, Schulz, R
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume31
Issue3
Pagination415-438
ISSN Number0898-2643
KeywordsCaregiving, Cognitive Ability, Grandparents, Intergenerational ties
Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between noncustodial grandparent caregiving and cognition using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a population-based study of older adults. Method: Participants were White and African American grandparents aged ≥65 years. Only noncustodial grandparents who reported not living with their grandchildren over the three waves were included in our analyses. Grandparent caregiving status and cognition were assessed in 2006, 2008, and 2010. Analyses controlled for demographics, baseline health, depressive symptoms, and baseline cognition. Results: Both the number of waves of grandparent caregiving and the total number of grandparent caregiving hours across the three waves were associated with better cognitive functioning at 4-year follow-up in 2010. Associations were observed among Whites, but not among African Americans. Discussion: This study uses longitudinal data to evaluate the association between grandparent caregiving and cognitive functioning. Findings suggest that providing care may be beneficial for some grandparents.

URLhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0898264317733362http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0898264317733362
DOI10.1177/0898264317733362
Short TitleJ Aging Health
Citation Key9367