Isolation, not loneliness or cynical hostility, predicts cognitive decline in older Americans.

TitleIsolation, not loneliness or cynical hostility, predicts cognitive decline in older Americans.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsGriffin, SC, Mezuk, B, Williams, ABaylor, Perrin, PB, Rybarczyk, BD
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
ISSN Number1552-6887
KeywordsCognition & Reasoning, Depressive symptoms, Loneliness, Risk Factors
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To jointly examine isolation, loneliness, and cynical hostility as risk factors for cognitive decline in older adults.

METHOD: Data came from the 2006 to 2012 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a longitudinal study of U.S. older adults (age ⩾ 65 years, n = 6,654). Measures included frequency of contact with social network (objective isolation), the Hughes Loneliness Scale (loneliness), a modified version of the Cook-Medley Hostility Inventory (cynical hostility), and a modified version of the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (cognitive function). Multilevel modeling (random slope + intercept) was used to examine the association between these factors and trajectories of cognitive function.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: After controlling for demographic characteristics, self-reported health, and functional limitations, loneliness (β = -.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [-0.56, -0.11), and cynical hostility (β = -.14, 95% CI = [-0.24, -0.04) correlated with lower cognitive function, but none predicted change in cognitive function. Objective social isolation was associated with lower cognitive function (β = -.27, 95% CI = [-0.41, -0.12]) and steeper decline in cognitive function (β = -.09, 95% CI = [-0.16, -0.01]).

DOI10.1177/0898264318800587
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30289338?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalJ Aging Health
Citation Key9972
PubMed ID30289338